Towns, Cities, Villages and Hamlets

Childerley

Samuel Lewis's Topographical Gazeetter 1831

CHILDERLEY, a parish in the hundred of CHESTERTON, county of CAMBRIDGE, 7½ miles (W.N.W.) from Cambridge, containing 50 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Ely, rated in the king's books at 6.9.2., and in the patronage of N. Calvert, Esq. The church, which was dedicated to St. Mary, is in ruins. After the capture of Charles I. by Cornet Joyce, in 1647, he was conveyed hither by order of Cromwell, who visited him, in company with Fairfax, both of them disavowing all participation in the seizure of his person, and, at the king's request, caused him to be removed to Newmarket.

For the Family Historian details of available records can be found on the Childerley page of GENUKI Cambridgeshire.

CHILDERLEY is a parish, 6 miles north-east from the Old North Road station on the Bedford and Cambridge branch of the London, Midland and Scottish railway and about 6 from Swavesey station on the London and North Eastern railway, 9 north-west from Cambridge and 13 north-east from St. Neots, in hundred and union of Chesterton, petty sessional division and county court district of Cambridge, rural deanery of Bourn and archdeaconry and diocese of Ely.

There were originally two churches here, one of which was dedicated to St. Mary; both were destroyed and the village depopulated by Sir John Cutte bart. of Childerley, about the beginning of the 16th century, for the purpose of forming a deer park. Divine service is conducted in the chapel attached to Childerley Hall.

Childerley Hall, the property and residence of Francis Benjamin Brooke esq. is a mansion in the Elizabethan style, and was rebuilt upon the foundation of the manor house, the old seat of the Cutts family: to this house Charles I. was brought in 1647 by the messengers of Cromwell, after his seizure at Holdenby Hall, in Northamptonshire; the ancient and elaborately painted and wainscoted room which he occupied, now called by his name, is carefully preserved, and the paintings in it have been restored. The farm buildings on the estate are most extensive, and include a barn 333 feet in length.

The soil is strong clay; subsoil, yellow clay. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 1,072 acres; the population in 1921 was 24.

[Extracts from Kelly's Directory - Cambridgeshire - 1929]

Domesday Book Entry

In CHILDERLEY Roger holds 3 hides from Bishop R(emigius). Land for 2½ ploughs. In lordship 1; 1 villaher and 5 smallholders with 1 plough; [another] ½ plough possible. 1 cottager; 3 slaves. Wod for fences. Value 50s; when acquired 40s; before 1066, 100s. iward, Earl Harold's man, held this manor; he could sell.

In CHILDERLEY Robert holds 2 hides from Picot. Land for 1 plough. This (land) is assessed in Lolworth but it answers in Childerley. 4 Freemen held this land. 3 of them were King Edward's men, the fourth was Edeva the Fair's man; they could sell.

In CHILDERLEY Picot holds 5 hides from the Countess. Land for 5 ploughs. In lordship 1; 5 villagers with 6 smallholders and 3 cottagers have 4 ploughs. 1 slave; wood for fences. Value £4; when acquired 70s; before 1066 £8. A man of Earl Waltheof's held this land and could sell.

In CHESTERTON Hundred (these men) swore

ROGER of CHILDERLEY Bruning of CHESTERTON
Giffard of (DRY) DRAYTON Aelmer of COTTENHAM
Gilbert of HISTON Ledmer of (DRY) DRAYTON
Sturmid of COTTENHAM Ernwy of CHILDERLEY

and all other Frenchmen and Englishmen of this Hundred swore.

War Memorial

The war memorial and the men on it have been documented on the Roll of Honour Cambridgeshire page

 

 

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